ryanottley

sirjoey-23 asked:

What does it take to be a comic book artist?

ryanottley answered:

First it takes someone who not only can draw but who wants to get better so badly that they will obsess about it everyday in their sketchbook and feel the frustration that comes with learning and growing and they will also rise above the inadequate feelings and low confidence and believe in themselves to a point where they are ok with making mistakes and growing from them, they are ok with busting out pages as fast as they can and as best as they can for a deadline. And they are ok with being broke for a while. Being an artist ain’t no joke, you’ll go through a time of being dirt poor. And if you are good/creative enough, and fast enough, and easy to work with enough, then you’ll Probably land a sweet gig. So basically it takes talent plus persistence plus luck. Enjoy.

dcjosh

empaya-comics asked:

Dear Ryan, what are (in your opinion) the top 5 mistakes to avoid, when creating comics? Thank you very much in advance.

ryanottley answered:

1. Don’t drink and draw on the same table. Wet drawings suck.
2. Don’t draw at home with kids in the house! They will ruin your drawings trying to be like you.
3. Don’t change the script too much, writers don’t like that.
4. Don’t play damn video games on weekdays and during deadline crunches. Just don’t.
5. Don’t draw slow. Draw fast. Don’t draw poorly. Draw greatly!

And those are the 5 most common things to avoid. Don’t do those.

potatofarmgirl

Anonymous asked:

hey there! I've seen your drawings and do you have any tips on perspective? because when I try to draw some perspective the result is horrendous haha... :)

urdchama answered:

hay cozin! Your question is pretty vague, so I’m gonna assume you’re talking about drawing a figure in perspective.

There are many many excellent tutorials on the internet about the basics of perspective, and it can get very technical very fast. So when it comes to applying those principles to your drawing, keep these things in mind:

1. Decide what sort of “shot” you want for your art piece. There’s only 3 options!

image

The level shot also doubles as an extreme upshot or downshot. (Looking straight up or straight down at something.)

Make it easy on yourself and keep the vanishing point inside the canvas - it creates a deeper space, and makes it easier to stack multiple objects in frame. (The vanishing point falls slightly above the horizon, because of Earth’s curvature. But for simple figure drawing it doesn’t even matter. You can place it on the horizon line.)

If you need them, you can add additional guides.

So now you have your setup, and with the help of any basic tutorial you can place a cube shape into the scene.

Easy peasy. BUT. For the purposes of drawing a figure, it’s more helpful to use a cylinder - cause most of the human body can be simplified into cylinder shapes. And here is where your best friend comes in:

2. Use wrapping lines to define the volume of a shape: 

In a downshot most of the wrapping lines will bow downward, in an upshot they’ll arch upward. In a level shot, they’ll arch up above the horizon line, and down below the horizon line. Totes easy.

And so then you place the figure into your scene, and stack the shapes of the body according to perspective. Use as many wrapping lines (also known as contour lines) as you need to help you really see the form in 3D.

Hope this helps. :)

comicsalliance
comicsalliance:

MATT CHAPMAN & ANDY SURIANO’S ‘COSMIC SCOUNDRELS’ IS THE BROS IN SPACE COMIC YOU NEED IN YOUR LIFE
By Chris Sims
At its heart, Cosmic Scoundrels is exactly what it says on the cover: Two gentleman of dubious morals who are prone to doing crimes, and who also happen to be in space. This will be your first clue that subtlety is not exactly what Chapman and Suriano are interested in, but rest assured that it will not be your last.

Instead, they’re interested in just going all out from the moment things get started. That’s one of the things I really love about what they’ve done so far — and what I love about first issues in general, as we’ve seen pretty recently — it hits the ground running. There’s no real setup involved, it’s all done through the action, and the action is bizarre.

Take, for example, the fact that the very first thing that happens in this comic is an assault on a gigantic, improbably shaped starfaring cruise ship/waffle bar called Midnight Fernando.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

MATT CHAPMAN & ANDY SURIANO’S ‘COSMIC SCOUNDRELS’ IS THE BROS IN SPACE COMIC YOU NEED IN YOUR LIFE

By Chris Sims

At its heart, Cosmic Scoundrels is exactly what it says on the cover: Two gentleman of dubious morals who are prone to doing crimes, and who also happen to be in space. This will be your first clue that subtlety is not exactly what Chapman and Suriano are interested in, but rest assured that it will not be your last.

Instead, they’re interested in just going all out from the moment things get started. That’s one of the things I really love about what they’ve done so far — and what I love about first issues in general, as we’ve seen pretty recently — it hits the ground running. There’s no real setup involved, it’s all done through the action, and the action is bizarre.

Take, for example, the fact that the very first thing that happens in this comic is an assault on a gigantic, improbably shaped starfaring cruise ship/waffle bar called Midnight Fernando.

READ MORE